Saturday, 5 July 2008

Sheep and Technology

I forgot to take photos of the sheep shearing day. Our two local New Zealanders turned up at 7am and got to work straight away. No time for a chat or how's ya father. It was heads down, clippers out and sheep in the back wash. They had been brought in the night before by the farmer and so must have realised something was on the cards. As we have been blessed with relatively warm weather all week, I doubt they would have bothered about being stripped of their pride.


We had two helpers, one a local farmer from across the fields and the other our lambing assistant. She's Merlin's Wizzard, another blogger. We didn't meet through blogging but through a mutual friend, she got into blogging after meeting me. I guess I kept telling her how amazing it is and she decided to find out for herself. She has severe anaphylaxis which in English is a complete major allergy to Fish. Whenever she comes to the farm we have to make sure there is no fish in sight. That she won't be able to smell it or taste it and possibly not even see it as it makes her anxious. The cat wasn't too happy during the lambing as we had to save up the Whiska's salmon flavoured tins and she got sick of beef and chicken. Plus fish and chips was off the menu of our Saturday night takeaway. How unfair is that!


I have massively digressed. The clipping, or shearing, went very well and was finished by mid afternoon. I was in such a good mood that I made everyone bacon and egg barmcakes and hotdogs in finger rolls. Plus tea and coffee in flasks. And everything I'd said beforehand went by the by. They were actually quite grateful and everyone sat around on the wool table enjoying brunch. I went out after that. We managed eight sacks of wool at the end. The sacks are about 4ft x 4ft.


My good mood has also given me inspiration to get technical with the computer this week. I have signed up with gmail so that I can talk to a friend in Canada, otherwise known as Aims. We actually talk to eachother with headphones and a microphone. How amazing is that! For me, it's pretty darn cool. My technical talent just about stretches to pressing the on/off button. But I find this experience incredible. The line is so clear. I wonder if David Tennant is on gmail........

23 comments:

  1. Lovely post. I'm glad the shearing went well.

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  2. "...no time for a how's ya father" Oh my that brings back long forgotten voices - haven't heard that phrase in so many years!

    Glad you are in such a good mood. Now please, what are "barmcakes" when they're at home??

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  3. I need to get our sheep clipped but every day I set aside it's rained and they are wet, missed the great weather at the beginning of the week due to work. Bit rough being so allergic to fish

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  4. Leatherdykeuk - Thanks, me too.

    Violetsky - Barmcakes are a Mancunian term for bread rolls or baps.

    Milkmaid - We were afraid of the same thing happening, that's why the farmer got them all inside the sheds. It is a tough call for M'sW. She's so lovely.

    Thanks for your comments, CJ xx

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  5. Wow. That is getting technical. Sounds like a great way to keep in touch with people. My sister and I keep wanting to set up video chat. Waiting for Joe to help me.

    So glad the shearing was good. Sounds like a lot of work.

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  6. Sheep shearing sounds exciting and exhausting.

    Have you and Aims done any video chats? Those are cool, too, and free. My husband chats with a guy in Hong Kong. I bet the phone companies hate it.

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  7. Right stop kntting, an award awaits you over at my place TFX

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  8. So pleased that the shearing went better and more harmoniously than you had anticipated. And the link with Aims is just marvellous. We really are getting to know each other aren't we? M xx

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  9. The shearing sounds like a lovely day - out in the fresh air communing with nature and finishing off with bacon baps - my idea of heaven!!.

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  10. Crystal, that was a very interesting post! Lovely to hear about the sheep shearing and the brunchies and the men working there from New Zealand.
    The anaphylaxis is quite a problem. We have it at school with a fair few children who have nut allergy & egg allergy. They carry Epipens and we have all had to be trained to revive them! We cannot go to school after eating nuts or egg & no one is allowed to bring nuts of any kind to school.

    You are talking to Aims, Blimey!
    Am I the only person doing blogging who wants to remain anonymous? I am beginning to think so!

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  11. Marla - It is an excellent way to keep in touch, techology (and me) gone mad!

    Amy - No video chats as yet but now that I'm a computer whizz-kid there's hope for anything!!

    TF - Thanks for the award, displayed on my sidebar.

    M - Yes, I agree we are getting to know each other.

    Rosiero - Wouldn't say it was lovely but the fresh air is always welcome.

    Maggie May - Our men are just local lads, my wishful thinking that they are from NZ!

    Thank you for your comments, Crystal xx

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  12. The video conferencing- (fancy name for video chat at work) is truly amazing. No one ever has to leave their house or office- unless of course they have sheep to shear!

    Great post.

    Love,

    Suzy

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  13. Three bags full.....

    I'd take a bag if it wasn't so darn expensive to ship across the pond....

    I think I could get at least 2 sweaters out of it...or in your case - jumpers...

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  14. How Cool is That!!!! I've not done that bit yet...too difficult sounding!!LOL...Happy chatting sweetie!!hughugs

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  15. Hi crystal, It's so nice to hear about the country when I'm living in the city with no escape! The only other relief I get is listening to the Archers!!!

    Hope the cat is back on the salmon by now!!

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  16. I've been meaning to get a headphone to do that, but so lazy. It only costs 4p a minute to call Oz so I don't mind giving up a little money to speak to home.

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  17. I am amazed at how large those sacks of wool are! Doesn't the assistnat have an epipen in case of an anayphylactic reaction?

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  18. Lovely Hubby went to the Outer Hebrides to help his Uncle shear sheep when he was training to be a vet... he learnt to shear sheep and DRINK WHISKY he always says the more he drunk the better he got at the shearing!! I am not sure that its true or the sheep would have agreed with him.
    Great Blog CJ.
    Blossom

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  19. DJ - Yes, she leaves an epipen here all the time.

    Thank you for all your comments, Crystal xx

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  20. My daughter and SIL have been at the shearing too.

    I am impressed with your technical expertise!

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  21. no he's not! leave him alone! teehee

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  22. Thankx for the comment- that was great!

    Take Care
    MW
    xxx

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